The Power of a Name: The Vietnam Veterans Memorial at 30 by Allan Greenberg
Veterans and the general public have embraced the memorial, despite early controversy.

Photo by: Peter Marlow/Magnum Photos

The Power of a Name: The Vietnam Veterans Memorial at 30 by Allan Greenberg

Veterans and the general public have embraced the memorial, despite early controversy.


Photo by: Peter Marlow/Magnum Photos

California Needs a Crude Awakening
Black gold could revive the Golden State—if politicians got out of the way.
by Tom Gray
California Needs a Crude Awakening
Black gold could revive the Golden State—if politicians got out of the way.

by Tom Gray

by Nicole Gelinas

In America, Olympic season is over. Our country’s official broadcaster of the games, NBC, decided to skip coverage of the Paralympics, the contests for disabled athletes. In London, though, where the Paralympics began last week, Channel 4 and the local newspapers are covering the Paralympics just as enthusiastically as the city’s media followed the non-disabled Olympics last month. The prime-time reports and front-page tabloid and broadsheet ink alike reveal unexpected news: the Paralympics and their participants are fascinating. As a crop of world-class athletes rivets Britain, Americans are missing out.

James Panero discusses his latest City Journal article about the conflict between gentrification and institutionalization on the Upper West Side of Manhattan Read the full article: http://www.city-journal.org/2012/22_3_upper-west-side.html

Coal Comfort
The EPA hates the carbon-heavy fuel, but it’s here to stay.
by Robert Bryce

"Since the days of Edison, the United States has relied on abundant supplies of coal to sustain its economy and to produce the electrons that are the currency of modernity. There’s no natural reason for that dependence to end…The only obstacle is the EPA, which wants to shut down coal-fired generation even though doing so will have no discernible effect on climate change or CO2 emissions."  Read more.
Coal Comfort
The EPA hates the carbon-heavy fuel, but it’s here to stay.
by Robert Bryce
"Since the days of Edison, the United States has relied on abundant supplies of coal to sustain its economy and to produce the electrons that are the currency of modernity. There’s no natural reason for that dependence to end…The only obstacle is the EPA, which wants to shut down coal-fired generation even though doing so will have no discernible effect on climate change or CO2 emissions."  Read more.
The Curriculum Reformation
New national standards prod schools to return to content-based education.

by Sol Stern
"The biggest new thing in American public education these days is a two-volume, 230-page, written-by-committee document called the Common Core State Standards. Forty-five states have pledged to the federal government that they will adopt the standards—which specify the math and English skills that students must attain in each grade from kindergarten to the end of high school—within the next several years. Some of these states genuinely believe that doing so will make more of their students ready for college and careers. Others are on board primarily because the Obama administration has enticed them with billions of dollars from its Race to the Top competition, part of the administration’s economic-stimulus program. Within the school-reform community, the standards have set off a virtual civil war. It pits those who believe that America desperately needs national standards to catch up to its international competitors against those who think that the administration, by imposing the standards on the states, is guilty of an unwise, or even illegal, power grab….” Read full article
The Curriculum Reformation
New national standards prod schools to return to content-based education.
by Sol Stern

"The biggest new thing in American public education these days is a two-volume, 230-page, written-by-committee document called the Common Core State Standards. Forty-five states have pledged to the federal government that they will adopt the standards—which specify the math and English skills that students must attain in each grade from kindergarten to the end of high school—within the next several years. Some of these states genuinely believe that doing so will make more of their students ready for college and careers. Others are on board primarily because the Obama administration has enticed them with billions of dollars from its Race to the Top competition, part of the administration’s economic-stimulus program. Within the school-reform community, the standards have set off a virtual civil war. It pits those who believe that America desperately needs national standards to catch up to its international competitors against those who think that the administration, by imposing the standards on the states, is guilty of an unwise, or even illegal, power grab….” Read full article

by John B. Taylor

Burdened by slow growth and high unemployment—especially long-term unemployment—the American economy faces an uncertain future. We have endured a painful financial crisis and recession, the recovery from which has been nearly nonexistent. Federal debt is exploding and threatening our children and grandchildren. In my view, the reason for this predicament is clear: we have deviated from the principles of economic freedom upon which America was founded….

"Paul Krugman lives in an unreal world: his book could even qualify him for another Nobel Prize—in literature."

Paul Krugman’s Follies: The Nobel-winning economist embraces fantasy
by Guy Sorman

Washingtonianism
The Father of his Country’s vision for the American Founding
by Myron Magnet

"For we who believe that great men, not impersonal forces, make history, George Washington is Exhibit A. As the Revolution’s commander in chief, president of the Constitutional Convention, and first president of the United States, he was luminously the Founding’s indispensable man…” [Read full article]
Washingtonianism
The Father of his Country’s vision for the American Founding

by Myron Magnet
"For we who believe that great men, not impersonal forces, make history, George Washington is Exhibit A. As the Revolution’s commander in chief, president of the Constitutional Convention, and first president of the United States, he was luminously the Founding’s indispensable man…” [Read full article]

The Second-Rate City?

by Aaron M. Renn

Chicago’s swift, surprising decline presents formidable challenges for new mayor Rahm Emanuel.

In the 1990s, Chicago enthusiastically joined the urban renaissance that swept through many of America’s major cities. Emerging from the squalor and decay of the seventies and eighties, Chicago grew for the first time since 1950—by more than 100,000 people over the decade. The unemployment rate in the nation’s third-biggest city was lower than in its two larger rivals, and per-capita income growth was higher. Chicago’s metropolitan area racked up 560,000 new jobs, more than either New York’s or Los Angeles’s in raw numbers and over twice as many on a percentage basis…[Read the full article]